This local food brand brings a green twist to your favorites

But Better’s plant-based fast food line

Going vegan has been among the hot topics debated all over the world. For years, animal activists have been protesting to urge people to adopt a more ethical diet, sparing animal products from their plate and devouring nothing but ethically-sourced food.

That is seen as a great challenge among meat-loving individuals. And it is hard to blame them when all throughout their living years, they found comfort in the medium rare steaks, roasted poultries, and a smorgasbord of seafood delights. But to make that happen, food brands and restaurants should not just go meat-free, but give diners plant-based alternatives that will give them the same satisfaction they get from animal products.

Homegrown food brand But Better sees that as well as the best first step toward converting people to a greener diet. With its sustainable and ethical initiative, the brand is dedicated “to contribute to the limited plant-based options in the fast food scene.”

“We are leaning into environmental impact,” founder and chef creator Christine Cruz tells Manila Bulletin Lifestyle. “We Filipinos consume fast food on average of two to three times a week. Given how detrimental the process to produce meat is and its contribution to carbon emissions, we were challenged to create a possible solution. To help lessen possible impact with great tasting plant-based fast food, we created all of our products in-house from patties to chickun sauces, and more. We know that comfort food can be the easiest solution.”

Established in 2019, But Better serves a healthy and sustainable food line, which is described as “fast food for all.” Its menu set features a range of vegan burgers mimicking beef, fish, and chicken with ingredients like tofu and mushrooms. It also serves plant-based mac and cheese with vacon (vegan bacon), not dog sandwich, and veggie chickuns made of deep fried jackfruit, among others. Looking at the food images alone, you can’t tell their difference from the real thing. Its flavors as well earn them a great digital following as the plant-based movement rises in the duration of the pandemic in the country.

The brand’s chickuns and vegan burger

“We grew our following organically and we got mostly good feedback and return,” Christine says. “Customers mostly thought that the items tasted like meat.”

There are a number of benefits to reap from having a plant-based diet. The best part is that these advantages branch out from the diners to the space they live in as well.

Not dog sandwich and vegan mac and cheese

“It is good for your body, we don’t preach or judge anyone at all but I think it’s scientific and general that it can only do you more good than bad,” Christine explains. “Second, the undeniable impact on our planet study says we might not be able to save our planet in its current condition but at least we can lessen the impact for an extended future. Last but definitely not the least is to help support/give livelihood to our local producers as they are the ones we should all be grateful for.”

Christine also believes that going plant-based should start from food brands and restaurants. The act should just fall on the diners alone to decide, and that big players have a significant role for the change to happen. These days, many fast food giants are slowly introducing vegan sets in their menus and is proving to be a one progressive step.

“Big chains are embracing plant-based options and the vegan market is growing around the world. We are open to collaborate and put our products in retail eventually,” Christine says. “We are planning to introduce a more fun and unique line-up soon.”

Check out @butbetterph on Instagram to see more of its vegan offerings.


Source: Manila Bulletin (https://mb.com.ph/2021/06/09/vegan-fast-food-local-food-brand-but-better-serves-just-that-and-more/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=vegan-fast-food-local-food-brand-but-better-serves-just-that-and-more)